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kitchen sinks (by bob [RI]) Jan 11, 2019 2:39 PM
       kitchen sinks (by plenty [MO]) Jan 11, 2019 2:42 PM
       kitchen sinks (by Richard [MI]) Jan 11, 2019 3:07 PM
       kitchen sinks (by NE [PA]) Jan 11, 2019 3:21 PM
       kitchen sinks (by 6x6 [TN]) Jan 11, 2019 3:38 PM
       kitchen sinks (by razorback_tim [AR]) Jan 11, 2019 3:39 PM
       kitchen sinks (by Landlord ofthe Flies [TX]) Jan 11, 2019 3:42 PM
       kitchen sinks (by Vee [OH]) Jan 11, 2019 6:48 PM
       kitchen sinks (by Vee [OH]) Jan 11, 2019 6:48 PM
       kitchen sinks (by Nellie [ME]) Jan 11, 2019 7:26 PM
       kitchen sinks (by RR78 [VA]) Jan 11, 2019 11:37 PM
       kitchen sinks (by LindaJ [NY]) Jan 12, 2019 6:20 AM
       kitchen sinks (by Robert J [CA]) Jan 12, 2019 9:37 AM
       kitchen sinks (by Busy [WI]) Jan 12, 2019 10:00 AM


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kitchen sinks (by bob [RI]) Posted on: Jan 11, 2019 2:39 PM
Message:

What is is the most practical choice for a new kitchen sink, that the average tenant will accept. By the way, I am pretty much through with using stainless steel, because I found that tenants consistently dent them.

Thank you

Bob

--173.48.xxx.xxx




kitchen sinks (by plenty [MO]) Posted on: Jan 11, 2019 2:42 PM
Message:

Dishwasher? If so i use single stainless but check our gauge of metal. --99.203.xx.xxx




kitchen sinks (by Richard [MI]) Posted on: Jan 11, 2019 3:07 PM
Message:

I get mine at Habitat Restore. About $20, often with a faucet. Tenants get what I give them. Paying $200+ for a sink would only be for Class B or higher and then likely only if I was going to sell it. --23.121.xx.xxx




kitchen sinks (by NE [PA]) Posted on: Jan 11, 2019 3:21 PM
Message:

The average tenant is going to accept what I give them. A 6-8" deep double bowl stainless steel sink. If they are too picky to accept that, they're pickier than I want as tenants. --50.107.xxx.xxx




kitchen sinks (by 6x6 [TN]) Posted on: Jan 11, 2019 3:38 PM
Message:

You could go cast iron but then they would just chip it. I would just stick with the stainless and make them pay if they dent it. How are they denting it anyway? What gauge are you using? --73.120.xx.xxx




kitchen sinks (by razorback_tim [AR]) Posted on: Jan 11, 2019 3:39 PM
Message:

I use stainless. If they damage the sink it comes out of their deposit. --70.178.x.xx




kitchen sinks (by Landlord ofthe Flies [TX]) Posted on: Jan 11, 2019 3:42 PM
Message:

I wonder if the same paintless dent repair services that fix car dents can fix sink dents? --108.69.xxx.xxx




kitchen sinks (by Vee [OH]) Posted on: Jan 11, 2019 6:48 PM
Message:

If the tenant rents the sink rent them with the cost of a new sink don't even think of waiting for the deposit, damaged in January - repair and Bill in February. --76.188.xxx.x




kitchen sinks (by Vee [OH]) Posted on: Jan 11, 2019 6:48 PM
Message:

If the tenant rents the sink rent them with the cost of a new sink don't even think of waiting for the deposit, damaged in January - repair and Bill in February. --76.188.xxx.x




kitchen sinks (by Nellie [ME]) Posted on: Jan 11, 2019 7:26 PM
Message:

Stainless Steel is your most durable sink material! Denting is about the worst you can do to it. And it would still be usable. It wonít crack, chip, stain, or burn.

Using a thicker gauge of 18 will make them more dent resistant. A 16 gauge even more so.

Granite/quartz composite can possibly stain if it is light colored and can crack. It is heat resistant and mostly resistant to staining. Give it a good scrubbing with a green Scotchbright pad and it looks good again.

Cast iron is heavy and can chip and scratch. As an enameled steel would do, also, only without the weight.

Acrylic can be scratched, heat damaged, and stains.

What I tell my customers when they ask what the best sink is to Stick with stainless. The real workhorse of kitchen sinks.

--64.222.xxx.xxx




kitchen sinks (by RR78 [VA]) Posted on: Jan 11, 2019 11:37 PM
Message:

After years of using the cheaper ones. We found it was worth it to use at least a 20 gauge stainless sink. Since then no dent problems to deal with. Lower the gauge number the thicker the metal.

Prices change so we check for the best price when we need one. Sometimes amazon better than the box stores.

Last month it was a Transolid STDE33227 from amazon. And was under 100.00 for a good quality sink. --73.152.xx.xxx




kitchen sinks (by LindaJ [NY]) Posted on: Jan 12, 2019 6:20 AM
Message:

Stainless steel is the best for tenants. All the others cost too much, are more easily chipped, stained, cracked, etc.

Go with a thicker gauge, but I rarely get a dent that is so bad it needs replacing. A good scrubbing with bar keepers friend shines it up like new. --108.4.xxx.xx




kitchen sinks (by Robert J [CA]) Posted on: Jan 12, 2019 9:37 AM
Message:

During my mandatory apartment inspections, the City won't allow kitchen sinks with chips or worn surfaces. So filling in the chips or having the sinks re-glazed is a waste of time. The tenants will abuse them non-stop.

So as a contractor I've leaned how to cut away the old sinks from the tiled counter tops and install new sinks. The sink of choice is:

Thick Stainless Steel two compartment sinks that are at least 7 to 9 inches deep. The put the sinks recessed into the tiles counter so the tenants can brush/wash the counter stuff into the sinks. Surface mounts have a lip so it's not easy to clean the counters. --47.156.xx.xx




kitchen sinks (by Busy [WI]) Posted on: Jan 12, 2019 10:00 AM
Message:

As someone who very strongly dislikes our disposable society, it really sticks in my craw that a city mandates such waste. But, I know it happens. Look at all the plastic and tape we have to use to comply with RRRP laws. More waste.

Robert J, sounds like you are making the very best of the situation. I hate to think of all of those sinks just going to scrap.

We donít have interior inspections in my city, so I can keep a slightly damaged item in use longer. I do get tenant inquiries about replacing a worn counter or sink, in my C Class rentals. I gently explain how Iím saving money for other improvements, like new, energy efficient (fill in the blank.) I explain how , I myself, being a klutz, and tough on a house, have learned to appreciate that things arenít perfectly new, as then I donít have to worry about being the first to damage something. That conversation has always gone over well for me. It helps that I DO make some of those other improvements. And, my tenants know I am very easy going about small dings, dents, kid-got-stoopid type damages. --70.92.xxx.xxx



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